John Marshall

John Marshall

Biography

My research lies at the intersection of comparative politics and political economy, and spans elections in developing and developed contexts. In particular, I study how news consumption, levels of education, and social networks influence how voters hold politicians to account for their performance in office. As well as bottom-up voter behavior, I am also interested in how politicians communicate their platforms, and how information shapes their electoral strategies, and when media outlets choose to report political news. I analyze this questions by combining quasi-experimental and experimental designs with theoretical models to identify and interpret causal relationships.

In Fall 2018, I will be teaching two classes: the first half of the yearlong graduate comparative politics field seminar, "Comparative Politics Survey I"; and a new graduate/undergraduate lecture class, "Political Economy Theory and Methods: Elites and Institutions", which combines theoretical and empirical methods to study key topics in comparative political economy.

Courses Taught