Undergraduate Courses

POLS G4110 Recent Continental Political Thought. 4 points.

This course will compare and contrast the theories of the political, the state,freedom, democracy, sovereignty and law, in the works of the following key 20th and 21st century continental theorists: Arendt, Castoriadis, Foucault, Habermas, Kelsen, Lefort, Schmitt, and Weber. It will be taught in seminar format.

POLS G4132 Political Thought - Classical and Medieval. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Contemporary Civilization or a comparable introduction to political theory course.

In this course, we will read classical and medieval writings that span multiple linguistic, historic and religious contexts. The goal is to explore similar notions of the just world that span these varied writings, from Plato's Republic to Zoroastrian and Early Islamic writings on just rule. Such similarities will highlight how some of these works represent cultural amalgams that blend Greek, Persian and Arabic elements. Yet, we will also consider how these writings differ and how their authors constructed them to respond to their unique political concerns. Throughout this course, we will consider how authors drew upon their foreign status, as aliens, outsiders, or clients to conquering tribes, to transform politics. And we will ask why these authors invoke and re-imagine particular models of the just world to represent their ideal notions of sovereignty, equity and justice. In the end, we will question how the foreign roots of ancient and medieval thought can help us fathom the basic underpinnings of founding documents today.

POLS G4240 Great Books on Race, Politics and Society. 4 points.

This seminar introduces students to classic works on race, social science, and public policy. The course will explore how social scientists have defined and constructed the conditions of black communities and how those definitions and constructions have varied and influenced policy debates over time.  Students are required to write an original research paper on a policy area that examines the tensions between individual and structural explanations for the persistence of racial inequality.

POLS G4433 Israel 20 Years After Rabin. 4 points.

POLS G4487 Politics in Russia. 4 points.

This course begins by studying the late Soviet era—the 1970s through the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991--in order to understand what kind of political system and political culture Russia inherited. We spend some time analyzing why and how the Soviet Union—a superpower for 75 years—disintegrated suddenly and for the most part, peacefully. Then, the bulk of the course focuses on state-building in the Russian Federation. Russia’s effort to construct new political institutions, a functioning economy, and a healthy society represents one of the greatest political dramas of our time. Beginning with Yeltsin’s presidency in 1991 and continuing through the current eras of Putin, Medvedev, and Putin again, we consider phenomena such as economic reform, nationalism, separatism, federalism, war, legal reform, civil society, and democratization. The third part of the course addresses Russia’s foreign relations. Like its predecessor states, the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union, Russia is concerned with what kind of state it is (or should be) and where it stands in the international order. We will study how Russian elites make sense of Russia’s identity, as well as Russia’s policies toward the US, Europe, its “near abroad,” the Middle East, and China.

POLS GR4454 Comparative Politics of South Asia. 4 points.

This course first compares the post-independence political histories of South Asian countries, particularly India and Pakistan.  It then explores selected topics across countries: social and cultural dimensions of politics; structures of power; and political behavior.  The underlying theme is to explain the development and durability of the particular political regimes – democratic or authoritarian – in each country.

Fall 2017: POLS GR4454
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4454 001/71128 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Philip Oldenburg 4 1/30

POLS GU4134 Modern Political Thought. 4 points.

Interpretations of civil society and the foundations of political order according to the two main traditions of political thought--contraction and Aristotelian. Readings include works by Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Montesquieu, Hume, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Saint-Simon, Tocqueville, Marx, and Mill.

Spring 2017: POLS GU4134
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4134 001/18122 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
558 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Nadia Urbinati 4 29/40

POLS GU4405 Insurgencies and Conflicts in Southeast Asia. 4 points.

A number of countries in Southeast Asia have recently faced violent conflicts, often linked to separatist or regionalist demands from territorially concentrated ethnic or religious minorities. This course examines a range of conflicts in Southern Thailand (Patani), Southern Philippines (Mindanao), Indonesia (notably Aceh) and Burma, through a variety of different lenses and comparative perspectives. These include security and (counter)insurgency perspectives, the comparative character of militant movements, perspectives based on minority rights and identity politics, explorations of the salience of religion, studies of language politics, questions of autonomy and decentralization, and the issue of peace negotiations and dialogue processes. These themes and issues have a broader relevance to wider debates in comparative politics, which students will be encouraged to explore in their papers.

Spring 2017: POLS GU4405
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4405 001/23960 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
304 Hamilton Hall
Duncan McCargo 4 18/18

POLS GU4406 Politics in Contemporary China. 4 points.

This course will be taught in Chinese.

This course focuses on the evolution of Chinese politics since the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) took power in 1949. It introduces and discusses the relationship between the two “three decades” (the three decades under Mao and the three decades of “reform and opening up”). More specifically, the course aims to (1) clarify some important historical facts, (2) analyze the ideological consideration of the “official” history sanctioned by the CCP and its epistemological impact, (3) make a comparison between official view and that of independent scholars about the history; (4) try to respond to some urgent problems faced by contemporary China, and (5) provide suggestions and principles for the reconstruction of the historiography of contemporary China. Students will learn how to understand the recent development Chinese politics, how to analyze the complex contemporary history and reality of China, and how to approach issues about China from a systematic perspective.

Spring 2017: POLS GU4406
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4406 001/22937 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
413 International Affairs Bldg
Boshu Zhang 4 14/25

POLS GU4407 Nine Thought Trends in China. 4 points.

This course will be taught in Chinese.

Prerequisites: fluency in Chinese (the course will be taught in Chinese, and a large number of readings will be in Chinese).

This is an elective course designed for both undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in the contemporary politics in China. The course focuses on nine major thought trends in China today that include 1) the Liberalism; 2) the New Authoritarianism; 3) the New Left; 4) Mao Left; 5) the Democratic Group within the Communist Party; 6) Governing through Confucian Theory; 7) Constitutional Socialism; 8) the so-called " Neither-Left and Nor-Right " Governing Theory; and 9) the New Nationalism Calling Tough Foreign Policies. China is deep in the social and political transition process, and the thoughts and actions of intellects themself have formed an important part in this transition. In this sense, the course not only helps understand the thoughts of intellects, but also better help understand today's China affairs as a whole.

Fall 2017: POLS GU4407
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4407 001/18100 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Boshu Zhang 4 11/25

POLS GU4434 Ethnic Politics Across Post-Soviet Eurasia. 4 points.

Various forms of ethnic politics have characterized politics in many states throughout Eurasia since 1991, from nationalist separatism to violent conflict to political competition among ethnic minorities and majorities. This course is designed to encourage students to think deeply about the relationship between ethnicity and politics. We will consider several questions. First, why does ethnicity become politicized? We investigate this question by examining nationalist secessionism and ethnic conflict—phenomena that mushroomed at the end of the Cold War. We will focus on East Central Europe and the former Soviet Union, devoting special attention to the cases of Yugoslavia, the USSR, Moldova, Abkhazia and South Ossetia, and Chechnya. However, we will also study cases in which the dog didn’t bark, i.e. places where nationalist mobilization and ethnic violence either did not occur, or emerged and then receded as in the ethnic republics of the Russian Federation (including the “Muslim” regions of Tatarstan and Bashkortostan, etc.). In the second part of the course, we will analyze ethnic politics after independent statehood was achieved throughout the post-Soviet space. How do nationalist state-builders try to construct a nation and a state at the same time? Have they incorporated or discriminated against minorities living within “their” states? How have ethnic minorities responded? We will study Ukraine, the Baltics and Kazakhstan where ethnic Russians and Russian-speaking populations form large portions of the population, devoting particular attention to the crisis in Ukraine. We will also examine how the post-conflict regions of Bosnia and Kosovo have dealt with ethnic pluralism. These cases allow us to gain greater understanding of how multi-ethnic states use forms of federalism, consociationalism, and power-sharing as state-building strategies.

Spring 2017: POLS GU4434
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4434 001/66329 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
1219 International Affairs Bldg
Elise Giuliano 4 19/25

POLS GU4461 Latin American Politics. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., Discussion Section Required

This is a lecture class that seeks to introduce students to social scientific analysis while discuss the shifting dynamics of political representation in Latin America. In analyzing political representation in the region, it focuses on demands for political inclusion by different actors and how they were resisted or accepted by established elites in a process that moved from regime change to electoral rotation in power. The course covers these political dynamics and their institutional consequences since the onset of the twentieth century, starting with the Mexican Revolution, until the contemporary period where democracy is the predominant form of government and elections a crucial tool for social and political change. While analyzing the politics of Latin America, we will cover important political science concepts associated with democratic representation, social inclusion and the rule of the law, such as social movement mobilization, political regime change, presidentialism, political party systems, political identities, state capacity, and institutional weakness.

Fall 2017: POLS GU4461
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4461 001/72524 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Maria Victoria Murillo 4 70/70

POLS GU4473 Political Transitions in Southeast Asia. 4 points.

What political direction is Southeast Asia taking? Over the past two decades, Indonesia has been transformed from a military-dominated semi-authoritarian state to the region’s most vigorous and open political order. Meanwhile Thailand has experienced two military coups since 2006, and early patterns of political liberalization seem to be unraveling. And Burma has gone from international pariah to prospective new democracy.

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Is it possible to see any overall regional trends? Are teleological assumptions of the inexorable rise of democracy being vindicated – or does much of the evident point in just the opposite direction? The module will examine the nature of transitions (and attempted transitions) to more open political systems in Southeast Asia, with a primary focus on Burma, Indonesia, and Thailand. After a brief review of the three cases, the course will adopt a thematic approach, first reviewing the character of the state, including national mythologies, the military and the relations between capital city and provinces. It will then explore aspects of transition, including the changing political economy, the rise of electoral politics, the role of religion and media, and the phenomenon of rally politics. Challenges to national elites from the regions will also be closely scrutinised. These themes and issues have a broader relevance to wider debates in comparative politics, which students will be encouraged to explore in their papers. 

Spring 2017: POLS GU4473
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4473 001/13282 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Duncan McCargo 4 11/18

POLS GU4700 Mathematical Methods for Political Science. 4 points.

Provides students of political science with a basic set of tools needed to read, evaluate, and contribute in research areas that increasingly utilize sophisticated mathematical techniques.

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NOTE: This course does not satisfy the Political Science Major/Concentration research methods requirement.

Fall 2017: POLS GU4700
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4700 001/22174 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
4 6/40

POLS GU4710 Principles of Quantitative Political Research. 4 points.

Introduction to the use of quantitative techniques in political science and public policy. Topics include descriptive statistics and principles of statistical inference and probability through analysis of variance and ordinary least-squares regression. Computer applications are emphasized.

Fall 2017: POLS GU4710
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4710 001/19062 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Mark Lindeman 4 38/68

POLS GU4712 Analysis of Political Data. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS W4710 or the equivalent.

Multivariate and time-series analysis of political data. Topics include time-series regression, structural equation models, factor analysis, and other special topics. Computer applications are emphasized.

Spring 2017: POLS GU4712
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4712 001/23188 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
420 Pupin Laboratories
Mark Lindeman 4 28/70

POLS GU4714 Multivariate Political Analysis. 4 points.

Prerequisites: basic data analysis and knowledge of basic calculus and matrix algebra OR concurrent enrollment in POLS W4760.

Examines problems encountered in multivariate analysis of cross-sectional and time-series data. Covers fundamentals of probability and statistics and examines problems encountered in multivariate analysis of cross-sectional and time-series data. More mathematical treatment of topics covered in POLS W4710 and W4712.

Fall 2017: POLS GU4714
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4714 001/26232 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Ju Yeon Park 4 5/40

POLS GU4730 Game Theory and Political Theory. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS W4760 or equivalent level of calculus.

Application of noncooperative game theory to strategic situations in politics. Solution concepts, asymmetric information, incomplete information, signaling, repeated games, and folk theorems. Models drawn from elections, legislative strategy, interest group politics, regulation, nuclear deterrence, international relations, and tariff policy.

Spring 2017: POLS GU4730
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4730 001/28274 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
304 Hamilton Hall
John Huber 4 19/40

POLS GU4732 Research Topics in Game Theory. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: POLS W4730 or the instructor's permission.

Advanced topics in game theory will cover the study of repeated games, games of incomplete information and principal-agent models with applications in the fields of voting, bargaining, lobbying and violent conflict. Results from the study of social choice theory, mechanism design and auction theory will also be treated. The course will concentrate on mathematical techniques for constructing and solving games. Students will be required to develop a topic relating political science and game theory and to write a formal research paper.

Fall 2017: POLS GU4732
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4732 001/66187 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Carlo Prato 4 9/40

POLS GU4768 Experimental Research: Design, Analysis and Interpretation. 4 points.

Prerequisites: one or two semesters of statistics; basic understanding of probability, hypothesis testing, and regression are assumed. Basic familiarity with statistical software (Stata and R) is helpful but not required.

In this course, we will discuss the logic of experimentation, its strengths and weaknesses compared to other methodologies, and the ways in which experimentation has been -- and could be -- used to investigate social phenomena. Students will learn how to interpret, design, and execute experiments.

Spring 2017: POLS GU4768
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4768 001/11156 T Th 7:40pm - 8:55pm
304 Hamilton Hall
Donald Green 4 19/40

POLS GU4845 National Security Strategies of the Middle East: A Comparative Perspective. 4 points.

At the crossroads of three continents, the Middle East is home to many diverse peoples, with ancient and proud cultures, in varying stages of political and socio-economic development, often times in conflict. Now in a state of historic flux, the Arab Spring has transformed the Middle Eastern landscape, with great consequence for the national security strategies of the countries of the region and their foreign relations. The primary source of the world's energy resources, the Middle East remains the locus of the terror-WMD-fundamentalist nexus, which continues to pose a significant threat to both regional and international security. The course surveys the national security challenges facing the region's primary players (Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Syria and Lebanon, Israel, the Palestinians and Turkey, Jordan) and how the revolutions of the past year will affect them. Unlike many Middle East courses, which focus on US policy in the region, the course concentrates on the regional players' perceptions of the threats and opportunities they face and on the strategies they have adopted to deal with them. It thus provides an essential vantage point for all those interested in gaining a deeper understanding of a region, which stands at the center of many of the foreign policy issues of our era. The course is designed for those with a general interest in the Middle East, especially those interested in national security issues, students of comparative politics and future practitioners, with an interest in "real world" international relations and national security.

Spring 2017: POLS GU4845
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4845 001/20024 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
253 Engineering Terrace
Charles Freilich 4 15/20

POLS GU4871 Chinese Foreign Policy. 4 points.

The course describes the major elements of Chinese foreign policy today, in the context of their development since 1949. We seek to understand the security-based rationale of policy as well as other factors - organizational, cultural, perceptual, and so on - that influence Chinese foreign policy. We analyze decision-making processes that affect Chinese foreign policy, China's relations with various countries and regions, Chinese policy toward key functional issues in international affairs, how the rise of China is affecting global power relations, and how other actors are responding. The course pays attention to the application of international relations theories to the problems we study, and also takes an interest in policy issues facing decision-makers in China as well as those facing decision-makers in other countries who deal with China.

Spring 2017: POLS GU4871
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4871 001/28140 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
309 Havemeyer Hall
Andrew Nathan 4 160/170

POLS GU4895 War, Peace, and Strategy. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Survey of the causes of war and peace, functions of military strategy, interaction of political ends and military means. Emphasis on 20th-century conflicts; nuclear deterrence; economic, technological, and moral aspects of strategy; crisis management; and institutional norms and mechanisms for promoting stability.

Fall 2017: POLS GU4895
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4895 001/74922 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Richard Betts 4 100/100

POLS UN1101 Political Theory I. 4 points.

What is the relationship between law and justice? Are capacities of political judgment shared by the many or reserved for the few? What does human equality consist of and what are its implications? Can individual freedom be reconciled with the demands of political community? What are the origins and effects of persistent gender inequalities? These are some of the crucial questions that we will address in this introductory course in political theory. The course is divided into five thematic sections, each addressing an enduring political problem or issue and centered on a key text in the history of political thought: 1. Laws, Obligations, and the Question of Disobedience; Sophocles, Antigone; 2. Democratic Citizenship and the Capacities of Political Judgment; Plato, Republic; 3. Origins and Effects of (In)equality; John Locke, Second Treatise of Civil Government; 4. Paradoxes of Freedom; Jean Jacques Rousseau, On the Social Contract; 5. The Woman Question; John Stuart Mill, The Subjection of Women.

Spring 2017: POLS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1101 001/06748 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
405 Milbank Hall
Ayten Gundogdu 4 72/80
Fall 2017: POLS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1101 001/17587 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Nadia Urbinati 4 80/80

POLS UN1501 Introduction to Comparative Politics. 4 points.

This course provides a broad overview of the comparative politics subfield by focusing on important substantive questions about the world today. The course is organized around four questions. First, why can only some people depend upon the state to enforce order? Second, how can we account for the differences between autocracies and democracies? Third, what different institutional forms does democratic government take? Finally, are some institutions more likely than others to produce desirable social outcomes such as accountability, redistribution, and political stability?

Spring 2017: POLS UN1501
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1501 001/18903 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Ren Kraft Center
Kimuli Kasara 4 117/140

POLS UN1601 Introduction to International Politics. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Lecture and discussion. The basic setting and dynamics of global politics, with emphasis on contemporary problems and processes.

Spring 2017: POLS UN1601
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1601 001/61729 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
417 International Affairs Bldg
Robert Jervis 4 197/300

POLS UN3100 Justice. 3 points.

An inquiry into the nature and implications of justice, including examinations of selected cases and issues such as Roe v. Wade, the O.J. Simpson case, the Pinochet case, affirmative action, recent tobacco litigation, and the international distribution of income and wealth.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3100 001/16185 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
209 Havemeyer Hall
David Johnston 3 89/100

POLS UN3170 Nationalism, Republicanism and Cosmopolitanism. 3 points.

Do we have obligations to our co-nationals that we do not owe to others? Might our loyalties or obligations to our fellow citizens be based on a commitment to shared political principles and common public life rather than national identity? Do we have basic duties that are owed equally to human beings everywhere, regardless of national or political affiliation? Do our commitments to co-nationals or compatriots conflict with those duties we might owe to others, and if so, to what extent? Is cosmopolitanism based on rationality and patriotism based on passion? This course will explore these questions from the perspectives of nationalism, republicanism and cosmopolitanism. We will consider historical works from Herder, Rousseau, Kant, Fichte, Mill, Mazzini and Renan; and more contemporary contributions from Berlin, Miller, Canovan, MacIntyre, Viroli, Sandel, Pettit, Habermas, Nussbaum, Appiah, and Pogge, among others.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3170
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3170 001/17084 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
602 Northwest Corner
Jessica Kimpell 3 27/30

POLS UN3190 Republicanism: Past and Present, or Plato to Pettit. 3 points.

The course is divided into two main parts. The first half examines features of classical republicanism and its developments from Greece and Rome up to the late eighteenth century. We will analyze the relationship between ethics and politics, the significance of the mixed constitution, the problem of political instability, the role of character in political action, and the relationship between virtuous citizens, good arms and good laws. The second half will be more issue-based, as we will examine the resurgence of republicanism in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, in part as a critique of liberal democracy. We will explore the efforts to define "republican" freedom, the relationship between equality and freedom (and the challenges posed by the market and inequality in resources), the relationship between republicanism and democracy, and the role and nature of civic virtue. The class will end with consideration of recent efforts on the part of some political theorists to redefine patriotism or loyalty to one's particular state in the modern world and to think about what republicanism might require on a global scale.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3190
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3190 001/29931 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Jessica Kimpell 3 30/30

POLS UN3210 Judicial Politics. 3 points.

Law and courts as political institutions. Considers the role of the judiciary within the American system of government, power relations within the judicial hierarchy, politics of decision making on the Supreme Court, the politics of Supreme Court nominations, the role of interest groups and public opinion in shaping judicial doctrine, the social impact and legitimacy of courts, and the political history of the legal system.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3210
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3210 001/11622 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
627 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Jeffrey Lax 3 35/40

POLS UN3213 American Urban Politics. 3 points.

This course examines the pattern of political development in urban America, as the country's population has grown in urbanized locations. It explores the process by which cities and suburbs are governed, how immigrants and migrants are incorporated, and how people of different races and ethnicities interact in urbanized settings as well as the institutional relations of cities and suburbs with other jurisdictions of government. The course focuses both on the historical as well the theoretical understandings of politics in urban areas.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3213
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3213 001/73782 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
717 Hamilton Hall
Carlos Vargas-Ramos 3 69/70

POLS UN3220 Logic of Collective Choice. 3 points.

Much of politics is about combining individual preferences or actions into collective choices. We will make use of two theoretical approaches. Our primary approach will be social choice theory, which studies how we aggregate what individuals want into what the collective “wants.” The second approach, game theory, covers how we aggregate what individuals want into what the group gets, given that social, economic, and political outcomes usually depend on the interaction of individual choices. The aggregation of preferences or choices is usually governed by some set of institutional rules, formal or informal. Our main themes include the rationality of individual and group preferences, the underpinnings and implications of using majority rule, tradeoffs between aggregation methods, the fairness of group choice, the effects of institutional constraints on choice (e.g., agenda control), and the implications for democratic choice. Most of the course material is highly abstract, but these abstract issues turn up in many real-world problems, from bargaining between the branches of government to campus elections to judicial decisions on multi-member courts to the allocation of relief funds among victims of natural disasters to the scoring of Olympic events. The collective choice problem is one faced by society as a whole and by the smallest group alike.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3220
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3220 001/64661 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Jeffrey Lax 3 70/70

POLS UN3222 The American Congress. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent, or the instructor's permission.

Inquiry into the dynamics, organization, and policy-making processes of the American Congress. Particular emphasis on the relationship of legislators to constituents, lobbyists, bureaucrats, the president, and with one another.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3222
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3222 001/10113 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Gregory Wawro 3 70/70

POLS UN3235 The American President. 3 points.

This course deals with the American Presidency as an institution and the behavior of the 43 men who have managed that institution. Lectures cover the origins of the office, growing out of the experience of the Constitution's framers; the growth of presidential power; presidential personality and leadership style; the changing character of the nomination process and permanent campaign; executive branch agencies that function as "presidential adjuncts;" and presidential accountability.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3235
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3235 001/71551 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
313 Fayerweather
Irwin Gertzog 3 59/70

POLS UN3285 Freedom of Speech and Press. 3 points.

Examines the constitutional right of freedom of speech and press in the United States. Examines, in depth, various areas of law, including extremist or seditious speech, obscenity, libel, fighting words, the public forum doctrine, and public access to the mass media. Follows the law school course model, with readings focused on actual judicial decisions.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3285
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3285 001/60905 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Lee Bollinger 3 210/210

POLS UN3290 Voting and American Politics. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Elections and public opinion; history of U.S. electoral politics; the problem of voter participation; partisanship and voting; accounting for voting decisions; explaining and forecasting election outcomes; elections and divided government; money and elections; electoral politics and representative democracy.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3290
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3290 001/64475 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Robert Erikson 3 64/64

POLS UN3545 Comparative Democratic Politics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: a statistical methods course such as POLS W3704, POLS W3720, POLS W3721, POLS W4710 or equivalent, as well as the ability to use (or willingness to learn) Stata.

This course focuses on the comparative study of democratic political processes, and in particular to the role that formal institutional arrangements play in shaping strategic political behavior.  In part I, the course examines the major themes in the comparative institutions literature, such as the impact of electoral laws on party systems, presidential versus parliamentary government, majoritarian and representational approaches in parliamentary systems, federalism, the design of judicial systems, etc. In part II, we examine how the nature of democratic institutions influences various types of outcomes, including political stability, political accountability, and economic policy.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3545
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3545 001/64783 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
503 Hamilton Hall
Hande Mutlu-Eren 3 16/30

POLS UN3595 Social Protection Around the World. 3 points.

This course employs the tools of comparative politics to account the development of social policies in both developed and developing countries. The policies and institutions by which governments provide social protection to their citizens vary significantly across countries. Some governments provide only meager benefits to a narrow group of citizens, while others cover the entire population. In some countries, these benefits are provided directly by the state, while in others, many responsibilities are delegated to societal organizations, such as labor unions, religious organizations and so on. In this course, we seek to establish the relative importance of institutional variables, social cleavages and partisanship in accounting for the variation in policy design. Secondly, we will explore the impact of existing social policies on a range of labor market outcomes, including inequality, unemployment and labor force participation rates. In exploring the recent politics of social policy adjustment, we will examine the extent to which strong existing differences among welfare states can endure in the face of unfavorable economic and demographic developments and common political pressures towards welfare state retrenchment.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3595
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3595 001/14556 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Isabela Mares 3 23/25

POLS UN3619 Nationalism and Contemporary World Politics. 3 points.

Nationalism as a cause of conflict in contemporary world politics. Strategies for mitigating nationalist and ethnic conflict.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3619
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3619 001/77732 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Jack Snyder 3 70/70

POLS UN3625 Rising Great Powers in International Relations. 3 points.

The rise of new great powers and hegemonic states has been a major engine of change in international relations, both historically and today.  Predominant theories of war, trade, and empire take as their starting point the uneven growth in the power and wealth of major states and empires. Rapid economic growth and associated domestic institutional changes in rising great powers often unleash a volatile domestic politics that affects the ideologies and social interests that play a role in formulating foreign policy.  In turn, the rising power’s international environment shapes the unfolding of these internal processes.  The course will study these dynamics, tracing patterns in historical cases and applying the insights gained to contemporary issues.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3625
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3625 001/28376 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
702 Hamilton Hall
Jack Snyder 3 64/70

POLS UN3690 International Law. 4 points.

What is public international law, and what does it influence the behavior of states, corporations, and individuals in the international system? This introductory course engages these questions as well as the politics of applying and enforcing public international law in various contexts and issue areas. An understanding of basic international legal principles, institutions, and processes is developed through exploration of foundational cases, and by means of (required) participation in a multi-week group simulation of an international legal dispute.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3690
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3690 001/72875 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
413 International Affairs Bldg
Tonya Putnam 4 41/60

POLS UN3704 Data Analysis and Statistics for Political Science Research. 3 points.

This course examines the basic methods data analysis and statistics that political scientists use in quantitative research that attempts to make causal inferences about how the political world works. The same methods apply to other kinds of problems about cause and effect relationships more generally.  The course will provide students with extensive experience in analyzing data and in writing (and thus reading) research papers about testable theories and hypotheses.  It will cover basic data analysis and statistical methods, from univariate and bivariate descriptive and inferential statistics through multivariate regression analysis. Computer applications will be emphasized.   The course will focus largely on observational data used in cross-sectional statistical analysis, but it will consider issues of research design more broadly as well.  It will assume that students have no mathematical background beyond high school algebra and no experience using computers for data analysis.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3704
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3704 001/26964 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
209 Havemeyer Hall
Robert Shapiro 3 101/100

POLS UN3720 Scope and Methods. 3 points.

This class introduces students to a variety of statistical methods used to investigate political phenomena. We will address the principles behind these methods, their application, and their limitations. The course aims to provide anyone interested in political science with a proficient understanding of the intuitions behind several of the methods most commonly used to analyze political data and identify causal paths. By the end of the course, students will have acquired important analytical and practical skills and will be able to evaluate the quality and reliability of scholarly and journalistic work done using quantitative methods. Students will also learn basic statistical software skills (R).

Spring 2017: POLS UN3720
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3720 001/20931 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
703 Hamilton Hall
Chiara Superti 3 44/40
Fall 2017: POLS UN3720
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3720 001/14011 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Chiara Superti 3 40/40

POLS UN3901 Independent Reading and Research I. 1-6 points.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3901 001/18844  
1-6 3/20
POLS 3901 002/87696  
Bernard Harcourt 1-6 0

POLS UN3902 Independent Reading and Research II. 1-6 points.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3902
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3902 001/77027  
Andrew Nathan 1-6 3/1
POLS 3902 002/10287  
Andrew Cooper 1-6 2
POLS 3902 003/71351  
Sudipta Kaviraj 1-6 1
POLS 3902 004/71396  
Justin Phillips 1-6 1
POLS 3902 005/12402  
Jon Elster 1-6 1
POLS 3902 006/28548  
Bernard Harcourt 1-6 1
POLS 3902 007/29646  
Carlos Vargas-Ramos 1-6 1
POLS 3902 008/28300  
Brigitte Nacos 1-6 3
POLS 3902 009/76096  
Paula Franzese 1-6 1
POLS 3902 010/63058  
Sharyn O'Halloran 1-6 1

POLS UN3911 Seminar in Political Theory. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted.

Seminar in Political Theory. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3911
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3911 001/61251 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Jon Elster 4 0/18
POLS 3911 002/21825  
4 0/18

POLS UN3912 Seminar in Political Theory. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted.

Seminar in Political Theory. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3912 001/12128 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Jean Cohen 4 8/18
POLS 3912 002/77011 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Jean Cohen 4 12/18

POLS UN3921 Seminar in American Politics. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted.

Seminar in American Politics. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3921
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3921 001/12276 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Fredrick Harris 4 14/18
POLS 3921 003/13606 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
Martha Zebrowski 4 0/18
POLS 3921 004/65591 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Brigitte Nacos 4 0/18
POLS 3921 005/77679 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
317 Hamilton Hall
Robert Amdur 4 0/18
POLS 3921 007/22344 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Judith Russell 4 4/18
POLS 3921 011/28382 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Michael Ting 4 0/18
POLS 3921 012/23074 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Rodolfo de la Garza 4 0/18

POLS UN3922 Seminar in American Politics. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted.

Seminar in American Politics. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3922
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3922 001/70087 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Fredrick Harris 4 19/18
POLS 3922 002/25824 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
418 International Affairs Bldg
Brigitte Nacos 4 28/18
POLS 3922 003/64572 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
317 Hamilton Hall
Robert Amdur 4 23/18
POLS 3922 004/71623 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Martha Zebrowski 4 7/18
POLS 3922 005/19072 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
John Sivolella 4 17/18
POLS 3922 006/60039 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Judith Russell 4 16/18
POLS 3922 007/15421 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
270b International Affairs Bldg
Robert Erikson 4 16/18
POLS 3922 008/74094 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
1302 International Affairs Bldg
Shigeo Hirano 4 9/18
POLS 3922 009/67835 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Robert Shapiro 4 17/18

POLS UN3930 Constitutional Law Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar explores major features of U.S. constitutional law through close examination of selected decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. Through student discussion and some lecturing, the seminar addresses issues arising from the Constitution's allocation of power among the three branches of government; the allocation of powers between the National and State governments, including, in particular, the scope of Congress' regulatory powers; and the protection of the individual from arbitrary and discriminatory government conduct, including the protections of the Fifth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments against unequal treatment based on race, gender and sexual orientation, the evolution of the concept of liberty from its protection of economic interests before the New Deal to its current role in protecting individual autonomy and privacy, and some aspects of the First Amendment's protection of freedom of speech and press. More generally the seminar aims to enhance understanding of some main aspects of our constitutional tradition and the judicial process by which it is elaborated.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3930
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3930 001/73831 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Sidney Rosdeitcher 4 0/18

POLS UN3951 Seminar in Comparative Politics. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: POLS V1501 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission. Pre-registration is not permitted. Please see here for detailed seminar registration guidelines: http://polisci.columbia.edu/undergraduate-programs/seminar-registration-guidelines.

Seminar in Comparative Politics. For most seminars, interested students must attend the first class meeting, after which the instructor will decide whom to admit.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3951
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3951 001/18670  
4 0/18
POLS 3951 002/75387  
4 0/18

POLS UN3952 Seminar in Comparative Politics. 4 points.

Seminar in Comparative Politics. Interested students must attend the first class meeting after which the instructor will decide whom to admit.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3952
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3952 001/72803 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
418 International Affairs Bldg
John Marshall 4 19/18

POLS UN3961 Seminar in International Politics. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: POLS V1601 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

Seminar in International Relations. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3961
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3961 001/18554 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Richard Betts 4 0/18
POLS 3961 002/26410 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
Rebecca Murphy 4 0/18
POLS 3961 003/67627 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Jean Krasno 4 0/18
POLS 3961 004/77017 Th 4:06pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Andrew Cooper 4 0/18
POLS 3961 006/25267 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Robert Jervis 4 0/18

POLS UN3962 Seminar in International Politics. 4 points.

Priority given to senior majors, followed by junior majors, then all other students.

Prerequisites: POLS V1601 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

Seminar in International Relations. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3962
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3962 001/23566 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
1219 International Affairs Bldg
Johannes Urpelainen 4 11/18
POLS 3962 002/74671 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
402b International Affairs Bldg
Dawn Brancati 4 18/18
POLS 3962 003/68867 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Andrew Cooper 4 11/18
POLS 3962 004/60674 W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Brooke Greene 4 22/18
POLS 3962 005/72729 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Jean Krasno 4 14/18
POLS 3962 006/71331 M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Rebecca Murphy 4 19/18
POLS 3962 007/19213 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
405 International Affairs Bldg
Linda Kirschke 4 10/18

POLS W3260 The Latino Political Experience. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

This course focuses on the political incorporation of Latinos into the American polity. Among the topics to be discussed are patterns of historical exclusion, the impact of the Voting Rights Act, organizational and electoral behavior, and the effects of immigration on the Latino national political agenda.

POLS W3535 Comparative Political Economy. 3 points.

This course aims to illuminate how political institutions and behavior shape economic outcomes, and vice versa, across the world today. Students will use economic modes of analysis to draw comparisons both within and across a diverse set of nations ranging from established democracies like the U.S. to nascent democracies like Afghanistan. The main focus will be on how the incentives facing individuals drive differences in economic development, democratic representation and voter participation in both developed and developing contexts. Starting at the level of national political systems, before analyzing the internal workings of institutions and the behavior of voters that underpin democratic systems, students will grapple with major contemporary debates including. The course will familiarize students with central political economy concepts—such as credible commitment, rent-seeking, electoral accountability and the collective action problem—as well as frontier empirical findings and methods shaping how we think about the interrelation of politics and economics. These powerful concepts and tools will empower students to think analytically, analyze macro phenomena in terms of micro-level incentives, and apply theoretical frameworks to answer specific questions in this course and beyond. Familiarity with introductory economics and statistics are encouraged.  

POLS W3630 Politics of International Economic Relations. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required

This upper-level undergraduate course examines the intersection of politics and economics at primarily the international level. The course involves the careful reading and evaluation of the dominant theoretical and methodological approaches as currently used in the IPE field, as well as examination of prominent debates within the major IPE subject areas of trade, finance, development and globalization.  This class does not have an economics or a specific political science prerequisite, but assumes a general understanding of historical and contemporary political and economic events. As a 3000-level course, this class would not be an appropriate choice for students who have not already taken introductory courses in political science, including international relations and comparative politics.

POLS W3680 Topics in International Security. 3 points.

This course explores how and why states and non-state actors use violent and non-violent strategies in international politics. While not all topics in international security can be covered thoroughly in one semester, this course will give a sampling of many of the topics, including military doctrines and strategies, diplomatic policies, social forces, civil wars, and roles of individuals. Though historical and current events will be used as examples to illustrate how various theories work, students should keep in mind that this is not a course on current events.

POLS W3998 Senior Honors Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: admission to the departmental honors program.

A two-term seminar for students writing the senior honors thesis.

POLS W3999 Senior Honors Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: admission to the departmental honors program.

A two-term seminar for students writing the senior honors thesis.

POLS W4474 Politics and Justice in Southeast Asia. 4 points.

The course starts from the premise that questions of justice are essentially political, and their study cannot be safely left in the sole hands of lawyers and legal experts. In recent years, a number of important global trends have become evident in the study of justice. These include a growing focus on transitional justice – especially how the transition from an authoritarian regime, or from conditions of violent conflict, may best be handled. Another important trend is the so-called ‘new constitutionalism’ – efforts to strengthen checks and balances through establishing new institutions such as constitutional courts. A third trend concerns disturbing developments in the use of the criminal justice system for essentially political purposes. This course will explore how these recent trends are being played out in various parts of Southeast Asia.

POLS W4496 Contemporary African Politics. 3 points.

This course aims to teach students what, if any, answers social scientists have to the questions that concern anyone with an interest in African politics: 1) Why have democratic governments flourished in some countries and not others? 2) What institutions may enable Africans to hold their leaders accountable? 3) How do people participate in politics? 4) In what ways do aspiring African political leaders build public support? 5) To what extent does persistent poverty on the continent have political causes? and 6) Why is violence used to resolve some political disputes and not others?

POLS W4764 Design and Analysis of Sample Surveys. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: basic statistics and regression analysis (for example: POLS 4712, STAT 2024 or 4315, SOCI 4075, etc.)

Survey sampling is central to modern social science. We discuss how to design, conduct, and analyze surveys, with a particular focus on public opinion surveys in the United States.

POLS W4790 Advanced Topics in Quantitative Research. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Instruction in methods for models that have dependent variables that are not continuous, including dichotomous and polychotomous response models, models for censored and truncated data, sample selection models and duration models.

POLS W4792 Advanced Topics in Quantitative Research: Models for Panel and Time-Series Cross-Section Data. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

This course covers methods for models for repeated observations data. These kinds of data represent tremendous opportunities as well as formidable challenges for making inferences. The course will focus on how to estimate models for panel and time-series cross-section data. Topics covered include fixed effects, random effects, dynamic panel models, random coefficient models, and models for qualitative dependent variables.

POLS UN3645 ADV IN INT'L POLITICAL ECON. 3 points.

This course examines the relationship between domestic and international politics and economic relations between countries. It addresses questions such as: Why do some countries promote globalization while others resist it? Why do some countries adopt inefficient economic policies? We will explore these questions and others by focusing on topics such as international trade, foreign aid, investment, and the

environment. For each topic, we will explore a variety of theoretical lenses and then examine the evidence in favor of each. More generally, the course will consider the challenges of drawing causal inferences in the field of international political economy. There are no prerequisites for this course but an introductory economics course would be helpful. Students will write a short reading response each week and produce a research proposal for studying a topic related to political economy, though they do not need to actually conduct this research.

POLS UN3122 Citizenship, Rights, and Immigration. 3 points.

Our political discourse is inundated with talk of citizenship. In this course we will examine various theories of citizenship, paying particular attention to the way the increasing complexity and multiculturalism of societies have challenged our understanding of this concept. We will also consider how different conceptions of citizenship address the challenges raised by both global and local forces. After an overview of different theories of citizenship, we explore the debates about political rights and representation for oppressed groups and minorities and consider the nationalist and cosmopolitan understandings of civic identity. What should be the criteria for citizenship? What rights should citizens have? Does citizenship require boundaries? Does democratic citizenship demand a particular kind of patriotism? What rights should illegal immigrants have? What role does the court play in defining citizenship rights? Can there be global or transnational citizenship? Though the primary focus will be to explore normative theories of citizenship, we will briefly consider how the European Union and the United States are dealing with some of the pressing issues regarding citizenship: immigration and assimilation. 

Spring 2017: POLS UN3122
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3122 001/29703 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
516 Hamilton Hall
Maria Kowalski 3 24/30

POLS UN3528 New and Old Forms of Political Protest. 3 points.

This course will introduce the students to the important topic of political protest. Each week we will address different aspects of the phenomenon: from the determinant to the actors and strategies of protest. We will discuss how the forms of protest have changed and the current role of the internet in general and social media in particular. Finally, we will discuss the role of the state and state repression, in particular censorship in the dynamics of protest. Since this is a comparative politics course, we will cover a range of different countries, including the United States, as well as both democratic and authoritarian regimes.

POLS GU4449 Cleavages, Conflicts and Bridges in Israeli Politics and Foreign Policy. 4 points.

Prerequisites: INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED

Conflicts, cleavages and contentiousness are a common feature of a democratic system of government in general. In this respect Israel is no exception. Apart from being the Start Up

Nation and the Holy Land, in the minds of many around the world Israel is associated with
conflict. Indeed, both internally and externally, Israeli politics is suffused with conflict and
continuously has to live up to the challenge of preserving democracy in the presence of conflict.
The achievements of Israel in the political, economic, international and social arenas were
facilitated by the emergence of a pattern of politics, indeed, a political culture, that puts a strong emphasis on the pursuit of political accommodation among social groupings, political parties and

ideological strands even at the expense of compromising their respective manifest interests,
aspirations and programs. Moreover, the mobilization capabilities of Israel's governments have
been remarkable by any standard. They were capable of inducing the citizens to accept willingly
such burdens as high taxation, harsh economic measures and long conscript and reserve military
service. Israel has done all these without loss of public support for its central political and social
institutions.
This class will focus on conflicts, external and internal. We will examine social, economic and
political cleavages within the state of Israel. We will study the Arab-Israeli conflict and in
particular the interaction of Israel with the Palestinians over the years. Finally, we will examine
broader circles in which Israeli foreign policy applies and in particular in the context of US-Israel
relations and in regional conflicts in the aftermath of the Arab Spring and the Iran Deal.

Spring 2017: POLS GU4449
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4449 001/11097 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Ehud Sommer 4 17/18

POLS UN3225 American Constitutional History. 3 points.

This course looks at key developments of American History through the prism of Supreme Court decisions and their aftermath.  A. How did the Supreme Court reflect, and affect, and effect, historic patterns of U.S. growth, expansion and development?  B. How did the Supreme Court respond to, or exacerbate, crises in U.S. history, and how did it impact the legal and economic framework that underpins what the U.S. has become, and is becoming?  C. How did the perception of individual and collective rights and liberties, and of the function and role of governments -- both federal and state -- evolve over time?

Spring 2017: POLS UN3225
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3225 001/85784 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
703 Hamilton Hall
Robert Tortoriello 3 22/30

POLS GU4702 Methods of Inquiry and Research Design. 4 points.

This course will cover research methods and research design in political science. We will focus on concrete and practical issues of conducting research: picking a topic, generating hypotheses, case selection, measurement issues, designing and conducting experiments, interviews, field work, archival research, coding data and working with data sets, combining quantitative and qualitative methods, etc.


The course is designed for several audiences, including:


• PhD students in Political Science


• MAO students undertaking a major research project


• Advanced undergrads contemplating an honors thesis, or another major research project

POLS UN3630 Politics of International Economic Relations. 3 points.

This upper-level undergraduate course examines the intersection of politics and economics at primarily the international level. The course involves the careful reading and evaluation of the dominant theoretical and methodological approaches as currently used in the IPE field, as well as examination of prominent debates within the major IPE subject areas of trade, finance, development and globalization.  This class does not have an economics or a specific political science prerequisite, but assumes a general understanding of historical and contemporary political and economic events. As a 3000-level course, this class would not be an appropriate choice for students who have not already taken introductory courses in political science, including international relations and comparative politics.

POLS UN3648 Governing the Global Economy. 4 points.

Who governs the world economy? Why do countries succeed or fail to cooperate in setting their economic policies? When and how do international institutions help countries cooperate? When and why do countries adopt good and bad economic policies? This course examines how domestic and international politics determine how the global economy is governed. We will study the politics of trade, international investment, monetary, immigration, and environmental policies to answer these questions. The course will approach each topic by examining alternative theoretical approaches and evaluate these theories using historical and contemporary evidence. There will be an emphasis on applying concepts through the analysis of policy-relevant case studies.

Fall 2017: POLS UN3648
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3648 001/26246 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
4 4/40

POLS GU4433 Israel 20 Years After Rabin. 4 points.

20 years after the assassination of Prime Minister Rabin, democracy is still thriving in Israel. The more than six decades of Israel's democratic system of government, under
intense external and internal pressures, have been facilitated by four major characteristics of its society and politics. First, a cultural aspect: a commitment to a national coalescent
orientation on the part of the majority of Israeli population, stemming from sentiments of Jewish solidarity and from the tradition of multi party democratic politics inherited from
the Yishuv, the Jewish community in Palestine prior to 1948. Second, a structural aspect:multiplicity of crosscutting social cleavages that provide for the diffusion of tensions
stemming from internal social conflict. Third, an economic aspect: availability of external resources such as US foreign aid programs, German reparations and Jewish donations.
Those made it possible to allocate resources beyond what was extracted from society. And, forth, a political aspect: oligarchic inclinations of political elites composed of
professional politicians, whose common interests have been to avoid ideological controversies and political confrontations among themselves

Fall 2017: POLS GU4433
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4433 001/62038  
Ehud Sommer 4 18/18

POLS GU4792 Advanced Topics in Quantitative Research: Models for Panel and Time-Series Cross-Section Data. 4 points.

This course covers methods for models for repeated observations data. These kinds of data represent tremendous opportunities as well as formidable challenges for making inferences. The course will focus on how to estimate models for panel and time-series cross-section data. Topics covered include fixed effects, random effects, dynamic panel models, random coefficient models, and models for qualitative dependent variables.

POLS OC3545 Comparative Democratic Politics. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Prerequisites: a statistical methods course such as POLS W3704, POLS W3720, POLS W3721, POLS W4710 or equivalent, as well as the ability to use (or willingness to learn) Stata.

This course focuses on the comparative study of democratic political processes, and in particular to the role that formal institutional arrangements play in shaping strategic political behavior.  In part I, the course examines the major themes in the comparative institutions literature, such as the impact of electoral laws on party systems, presidential versus parliamentary government, majoritarian and representational approaches in parliamentary systems, federalism, the design of judicial systems, etc. In part II, we examine how the nature of democratic institutions influences various types of outcomes, including political stability, political accountability, and economic policy.

POLS UN3680 Topics in International Security. 3 points.

This course explores how and why states and non-state actors use violent and non-violent strategies in international politics. While not all topics in international security can be covered thoroughly in one semester, this course will give a sampling of many of the topics, including military doctrines and strategies, diplomatic policies, social forces, civil wars, and roles of individuals. Though historical and current events will be used as examples to illustrate how various theories work, students should keep in mind that this is not a course on current events.

POLS UN3998 Senior Honors Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: admission to the departmental honors program.

A two-term seminar for students writing the senior honors thesis.

POLS UN3999 Senior Honors Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: admission to the departmental honors program.

A two-term seminar for students writing the senior honors thesis.

Spring 2017: POLS UN3999
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3999 001/71033 F 9:00am - 10:50am
Room TBA
Macartan Humphreys 4 14/18

POLS GU4764 Design and Analysis of Sample Surveys. 4 points.

Prerequisites: basic statistics and regression analysis (for example: POLS 4712, STAT 2024 or 4315, SOCI 4075, etc.)

Survey sampling is central to modern social science. We discuss how to design, conduct, and analyze surveys, with a particular focus on public opinion surveys in the United States.

POLS GU4790 Advanced Topics in Quantitative Research. 4 points.

Instruction in methods for models that have dependent variables that are not continuous, including dichotomous and polychotomous response models, models for censored and truncated data, sample selection models and duration models.