Graduate Courses

POLS G4113 Politics and Religion. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

This course will consider the ways in which the state, constitutional law and religion in liberal constitutional democracies have been articulated, justified and now challenged by political religion. We focus on developments in the U.S. but will consider European examples when relevant. The impact of political religion on state sovereignty, democratic legitimacy and gender equality will be analyzed.

POLS G4406 Politics in Contemporary China. 4 points.

This course will be taught in Chinese.

This course focuses on the evolution of Chinese politics since the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) took power in 1949. It introduces and discusses the relationship between the two “three decades” (the three decades under Mao and the three decades of “reform and opening up”). More specifically, the course aims to (1) clarify some important historical facts, (2) analyze the ideological consideration of the “official” history sanctioned by the CCP and its epistemological impact, (3) make a comparison between official view and that of independent scholars about the history; (4) try to respond to some urgent problems faced by contemporary China, and (5) provide suggestions and principles for the reconstruction of the historiography of contemporary China. Students will learn how to understand the recent development Chinese politics, how to analyze the complex contemporary history and reality of China, and how to approach issues about China from a systematic perspective.

POLS G4433 Israel 20 Years After Rabin. 4 points.

POLS G4434 Ethnic Politics of Eurasia. 4 points.

Various forms of ethnic politics have characterized politics in many states throughout Eurasia since 1991, from nationalist separatism to violent conflict to political competition among ethnic minorities and majorities. This course is designed to encourage students to think deeply about the relationship between ethnicity and politics. We will consider several questions. First, why does ethnicity become politicized? We investigate this question by examining nationalist secessionism and ethnic conflict—phenomena that mushroomed at the end of the Cold War. We will focus on East Central Europe and the former Soviet Union, devoting special attention to the cases of Yugoslavia, the USSR, Moldova, Abkhazia and South Ossetia, and Chechnya. However, we will also study cases in which the dog didn’t bark, i.e. places where nationalist mobilization and ethnic violence either did not occur, or emerged and then receded as in the ethnic republics of the Russian Federation (including the “Muslim” regions of Tatarstan and Bashkortostan, etc.). In the second part of the course, we will analyze ethnic politics after independent statehood was achieved throughout the post-Soviet space. How do nationalist state-builders try to construct a nation and a state at the same time? Have they incorporated or discriminated against minorities living within “their” states? How have ethnic minorities responded? We will study Ukraine, the Baltics and Kazakhstan where ethnic Russians and Russian-speaking populations form large portions of the population, devoting particular attention to the crisis in Ukraine. We will also examine how the post-conflict regions of Bosnia and Kosovo have dealt with ethnic pluralism. These cases allow us to gain greater understanding of how multi-ethnic states use forms of federalism, consociationalism, and power-sharing as state-building strategies.

POLS G4471 Chinese Politics. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

An introduction to the politics of the People's Republic of China since 1978 that examines why and how a Leninist system attempts to reform and the consequences. Topics covered include one party rule, market transition, property rights, and grassroots democracy among many others.

POLS G4487 Politics in Russia. 4 points.

This course begins by studying the late Soviet era—the 1970s through the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991--in order to understand what kind of political system and political culture Russia inherited. We spend some time analyzing why and how the Soviet Union—a superpower for 75 years—disintegrated suddenly and for the most part, peacefully. Then, the bulk of the course focuses on state-building in the Russian Federation. Russia’s effort to construct new political institutions, a functioning economy, and a healthy society represents one of the greatest political dramas of our time. Beginning with Yeltsin’s presidency in 1991 and continuing through the current eras of Putin, Medvedev, and Putin again, we consider phenomena such as economic reform, nationalism, separatism, federalism, war, legal reform, civil society, and democratization. The third part of the course addresses Russia’s foreign relations. Like its predecessor states, the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union, Russia is concerned with what kind of state it is (or should be) and where it stands in the international order. We will study how Russian elites make sense of Russia’s identity, as well as Russia’s policies toward the US, Europe, its “near abroad,” the Middle East, and China.

POLS G4491 Post-Soviet States and Markets. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: some familiarity with Communist or post-Communist states.

Considers the collapse of Communism in the Soviet Union and the challenge of building new political and economic systems in the post-Communist space. Evaluates contending theories of markets, transitions, constitutions, federalism, and democratic institutions. Primary focus on the post-Soviet states, with some reference to Eastern Europe and China.

POLS G4610 Recent Continental Political Thought. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

This course will compare and contrast the theories of the political, the state,freedom, democracy, sovereignty and law, in the works of the following key 20th and 21st century continental theorists: Arendt, Castoriadis, Foucault, Habermas, Kelsen, Lefort, Schmitt, and Weber. It will be taught in seminar format. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 4110.

POLS G4613 Politics and Religion. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

This course will consider the ways in which the state, constitutional law and religion in liberal constitutional democracies have been articulated, justified and now challenged by political religion. We focus on developments in the U.S. but will consider European examples when relevant. The impact of political religion on state sovereignty, democratic legitimacy and gender equality will be analyzed. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 4113.

POLS G4845 National Security Strategies of the Middle East: A Comparative Perspective. 4 points.

At the crossroads of three continents, the Middle East is home to many diverse peoples, with ancient and proud cultures, in varying stages of political and socio-economic development, often times in conflict. Now in a state of historic flux, the Arab Spring has transformed the Middle Eastern landscape, with great consequence for the national security strategies of the countries of the region and their foreign relations. The primary source of the world's energy resources, the Middle East remains the locus of the terror-WMD-fundamentalist nexus, which continues to pose a significant threat to both regional and international security. The course surveys the national security challenges facing the region's primary players (Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Syria and Lebanon, Israel, the Palestinians and Turkey, Jordan) and how the revolutions of the past year will affect them. Unlike many Middle East courses, which focus on US policy in the region, the course concentrates on the regional players' perceptions of the threats and opportunities they face and on the strategies they have adopted to deal with them. It thus provides an essential vantage point for all those interested in gaining a deeper understanding of a region, which stands at the center of many of the foreign policy issues of our era. The course is designed for those with a general interest in the Middle East, especially those interested in national security issues, students of comparative politics and future practitioners, with an interest in "real world" international relations and national security.

POLS G6211 Theories and Debates in American Politics II. 4 points.

This is the second of two semester-long courses that provide graduate students with an overview of the scholarly study of American politics. G6210 and G6211 constitute the American politics "field survey." The field survey is designed for political science graduate students who intend to specialize in American politics, as well as for those students whose primary interests are comparative politics, international relations, or political theory, but who desire an intensive introduction to the "American" style of political science. In this course we will cover a range of topics related to American politics that, for the most part, are not covered in G6210. The reading assignments are a mix of foundational contributions (i.e., the canons of American politics literature) and recent research. The first part of each seminar session will aim to clarify and probe enduring puzzles, theories, and debates highlighted in the foundational texts. The latter portion of the seminar session will focus on how recent research is continuing to engage the ongoing debates and puzzles.

POLS G6412 Comparative Politics Survey II. 4 points.

This graduate level seminar is designed to introduce students to many of the main questions motivating research in comparative politics. The course is not designed as exercise in intellectual history, although some "classics" are included. It is also not designed to teach particular approaches or methods in the study of comparative politics, although many such approaches and methods are included in the readings. Instead, it is designed to give students a sense of what we "know" today about the answers to some major questions that animate the subfield and to encourage students to develop the analytical skills, substantive knowledge, and theoretical insights necessary to make their own contributions to comparative politics and political science. Comparative Politics Survey II builds on the topics developed in Comparative Politics Survey I, but can easily be taken before taking Comparative Politics Survey I. Topics to be covered in the surveys include among others, institutions, culture, parties, violence, collective action, economic development, bureaucracy, regimes and regime change, the welfare state, corruption and political behavior.

POLS G6601 Issues In Political Theory. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

A survey of selected issues and debates in political theory. Areas of the field discussed include normative political philosophy, history of political thought, and the design of political and social institutions. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 6101.

POLS G8101 Colloquium In Political Thought. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Constitutionalism, Sovereignty and Religion. One of the greatest challenges to liberal, democratic and republican constitutionalism in the 21st century is posed by controversy over the relation between religion and the state. This course will explore alternative ways in which state and religion in constitutional democracies are and should be articulated. We will treat Federalism and Pluralism as alternative strategies for the management of the problem of difference, (particularly religious difference,) and for decentralizing the modern state. First, we will explore the common origins of both in feudal relationships, church self-government and the state of the estates. Second, we reconstruct the origins of the modern state and its doctrine of sovereignty, as answers to perceived threats in pluralist fragmentation, and imperial and papal trans-polity organization. Third, we will compare the new alternatives of centralized territorial state and decentralized federations.  Using Tocqueville we will present the American design combining federalism and pluralism. Fourth we will present some revivals, successful or attempted of federalism and pluralism in the contemporary world. Fifth, we will consider four case studies: Turkey (imperial pluralism and republican centralization); Israel (pluralism without federalism), India (centralized federalism and partial pluralism) and Canada (federalism and multi-culturalism).

POLS G8113 Interpretations of Democracy. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

POLS G8115 Themes in International Political Theory. 4 points.

POLS G8121 The Federal Convention. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

The seminar will cover the background and the dynamics of the Federal Convention that proposed the Constitution of the United States in 1787. The basic readings are Vols. I and II of Max Farrand's Records of the Federal Convention, mainly based on the notes that James Madison took during the Convention. (Passages from this work will be assigned later.) The purpose of the seminar is partly to illuminate the nature of constitutions and of constitution-making more generally, and partly to identify causal mechanisms that can explain the choices that were made at the Convention. Theories of collective action, of bargaining and of deliberation will have a central place. We shall not study the process of ratification of the Constitution, except to the extent that the framers' anticipation of the ratifying conventions constrained their choices. Nor shall we draw heavily on The Federalist Papers, except when they illuminate the sometimes cryptic statements in Madison's notes.

POLS G8124 Race in the History of Western Ideas. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Race in the History of Western Ideas is an advanced Political Theory course about the complex relationship between the scientific concept of race, political subjugation and the history of modern political ideas. Race in the History of Western Ideas is NOT a course about the political behavior of ‘racial' or ‘ethnic' groups. Nor does the course focus on ONE political theoretical approach or hypothesis (e.g.: Marxist, "anti-racist," liberal or multi-cultural) in answer to the questions "How/Why did ‘race' emerge as a legitimate account of human difference?" First we ask, how did the ancients think of human diversity? To answer, we examine how Aristotle differentiates citizens from slaves and foreigners, thereby proposes a hierarchical constitution that is central to the reciprocal rule proposed in Politics. We then examine the emergence of race as a "legitimate" theory of human difference in Enlightenment anthropology and liberal political thought. We identify the features of race thinking that serve to differentiate modern conceptualizations of human diversity and visions of ‘the political' from those of the ancient world. Finally, we examine how activist and anti-racist intellectuals sought to de-naturalize and thus re-politicize race by either demonstrating the fallacy of race science or linking the significance, ubiquity and power of race to political subjugation.

POLS G8140 Commerce and Civic Virtue. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

This graduate seminar in political theory will examine 18th century philosophies of commerce, civic virtue, and freedom, with a focus on arguments about the salutary political and moral consequences of economic interdependence both domestic and international. The course is centered on primary texts, including the works of Bernard Mandeville, Adam Smith, David Hume, Montesquieu, and Immanuel Kant. The selected reading will highlight the gradual dismantlement of the classical republican aversion to wealth accumulation, and the rehabilitation of avarice into an integrative (even edifying) social force. Students will be required to write a number of short discussion papers during the course of the semester, as well as a final research paper where they will focus on a particular problem addressed by one of the major thinkers covered in the class. In the research paper, students will also be required to develop familiarity with key positions in the secondary literature, with guidance from the course instructor.

POLS G8151 Normative Theories of Justice. 3 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Theories of retributive and distributive justice, with emphasis on work published during the last thirty years.  Competing formulations of the principle that people should not suffer as a result of brute bad luck and that relative advantages and disadvantages should as far as possible arise from voluntary choices.

POLS G8172 Republicanism. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

We will study the main texts of republican thought classical, modern and contemporary focusing on two main themes that are essentially related to contemporary political theory: republicanism's relationship with liberalism and with democracy.

POLS G8203 Colloquium on State Politics. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

This seminar is designed as an overview of the major debates in the comparative study of U.S. state politics. The primary goals of the course are to familiarize students with the principal questions being asked by scholars in this subfield, the methodological approaches employed, and the avenues available for future research. Students will be asked to critically evaluate the existing literature. Throughout the course, special emphasis will be placed on states as laboratories for the empirical examination of political institutions, behavior, and the policy-making process.

POLS G8210 Colloquium On Public Opinion and Political Behavior. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

An examination of research on public opinion, political behavior, and the American electorate, focusing on political sophistication, values, ideological thinking, partisanship, the dynamics of public opinion and policy making, and political participation. Methodological issues and survey research.

POLS G8219 Elections. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

POLS G8223 Legislative Behavior and Institutions. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

Examination of the interactions between individual incentives and political institutions in shaping policy. Presents an approach to the study of politics that emphasizes individual incentives in an electoral system, examines how re-election-minded legislators organize to solve collective dilemmas, and focusses on the effects of these political institutions on policy choice.

POLS G8230 Judicial Institutions. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

The focus is on the study of law and courts as political institutions and judges as political actors. Primary topics will include judicial behavior and decision-making, the internal politics of the Supreme Court, politics within the judicial hierarchy, politics between the judiciary and other branches, and the impact of courts.

POLS G8234 Urban Politics. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

This seminar is designed as an overview of the major debates in Urban Politics. The primary goals of the course are to familiarize students with the principal questions being asked by scholars in this subfield, the methodological approaches employed, and the avenues available for future research. Methodological diversity will be emphasized.

POLS G8265 Political Inequality in the United States. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission prior to registration.

A current topic of interest in political and academic circles is inequality, both as economic inequality (which is growing) and political inequality, which contributes to economic inequality. This seminar focuses on political inequality. It asks whether political influence is equally represented in the United States; if not, why not, and what can be done for reform?

POLS G8412 Political Economy of Development. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

POLS G8416 Comparative Political Economy. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

This seminar provides an introduction to the main theories of comparative political economy. The survey of these theories is organized as a progression from micro- to macro-level explanations. We begin by examining the sources of political cleavages over various economic policies and the formation of political coalitions. Next, we explore a range of theories positing that differences in the organization of interest groups lead to systematic differences in economic outcomes. We examine how comparativists have studied the problem of state capture by interest groups and its economic and political consequences. In the second part of the course, we apply these theoretical building blocks to a variety of issue areas, including financial development, taxation, the development of social spending and political responses to unemployment.

POLS G8426 Comparative Democratic Processes. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Attempts to integrate examination of presidential government in the U.S. and examination of parliamentary democracies in order to make a unified approach to the study of democratic institutions.  Focuses on a common set of issues that are faced by individuals in all democratic systems: coordination, cooperation, commitment, aggregation and delegation.

POLS G8427 Comparative Ethnic Politics. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course examines recent research and classic texts on the role of ethnic groups in political analysis. The class addresses three broad questions: what are ethnic groups, when do they become politically salient, and how does ethnic competition affect the distribution of resources in a society. Many of the readings utilize econometric methods. A statistical background at the level of W4710 is assumed, with familiarity through W4712 strongly recommended.

POLS G8428 Democracy, Autocracy and Regime Change. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

The formal and informal procedures that determine access to high political office vary greatly across countries and over time. Scholars of comparative politics have tended to study political regimes by explaining why some countries are democratic and others are not. In addition to surveying the large literature on democratization this seminar explores political regimes in a more general way. This course is intended for PhD students preparing for their qualifying exams enrollment is limited and doctoral students will be given priority. The readings assigned address the following questions: Why are some regimes democratic while others are not? Why do some leaders create public legitimating ideologies instead of relying primarily on force or cooptation? Why do some non‐democratic political leaders govern through institutions while others rely on networks of individuals who are personally beholden to them? Why are some ruling elites in non‐democratic regimes broader than others? What role do elections that are unlikely to change the identity of the head of state play in non‐democratic regimes?

POLS G8434 Latin American Politics In Comparative Perspective. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

Political structures, conflict and change in the region including discussion of selected countries, patterns of regime change and the involvement of the U.S.

POLS G8437 Parties and Elections in Developing Countries. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission prior to registration.

This course explores new research on the individual and organizational determinants of candidate selection, accountability, and representation in new and developing democracies. Developing democracies have weak states and parties that pose new challenges to existing research on democratic accountability. This course focuses on seven questions: 1) What purpose do political parties serve in places with low bureaucratic capacity 2) Why are some parties stronger (i.e., more disciplined, cohesive, and institutionalized) than others? 3) When will parties in developing countries campaign on programmatic platforms? 4) How do individuals decide which candidates to vote for? 5) When do politicians using vote-buying and patronage to win elections succeed? 6) Under what circumstances do politicians successfully use violence and economic threats to win elections? 7) How do politicians in new democracies manipulate institutional rules to win elections?

POLS G8440 Study of Development Strategies. 2 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

The focus of the course is close reading and re-analysis of emerging research in the political economy of development, broadly construed. The focus is on well-identified research whether based on experimental or observational data. It is intended for advanced graduate students (third-fourth year) who already have strong analytic skills. Auditors are welcome as long as they put in the work. Second time takers/auditors are also welcome. The overall structure is that in most weeks an external speaker comes to discuss new or in-progress research. The speaker does not present the work, however; instead they share their papers, data and code with the class in advance and a "replication team" has a week to put together a detailed discussion of the work. In other weeks we do something similar with work in progress of students in the class. Note this course has an unusal format, meeting roughly once every two weeks over the course of the year. The course meets late in the afternoon and is generally followed by a dinner for a group of participants.

POLS G8492 Comparing Institutions. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

Survey of the theoretical literature on the origin and structure of political and economic institutions. Special emphasis on the new institutional economics and other rational actor theories, with particular attention to the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches as tools for comparative analysis.

POLS G8493 Political Development. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

This is a graduate course in political development. It will focus on the development of, and relationship among, the three constituent features of the modern political world: states, nations and democracy. The course will analyze both historical and contemporary cases, tracing how states, nations and democracies developed over time and in different parts of the globe.  Along the way, the course will introduce students to the main theories, approaches and debates in the literature on state building, identity formation and democratization and consolidation.

POLS G8526 Comparative Democratic Processes. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Attempts to integrate examination of presidential government in the U.S. and examination of parliamentary democracies in order to make a unified approach to the study of democratic institutions.  Focuses on a common set of issues that are faced by individuals in all democratic systems: coordination, cooperation, commitment, aggregation and delegation. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 8426.

POLS G8601 Colloquium In Political Thought. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Constitutionalism, Sovereignty and Religion. One of the greatest challenges to liberal, democratic and republican constitutionalism in the 21st century is posed by controversy over the relation between religion and the state. This course will explore alternative ways in which state and religion in constitutional democracies are and should be articulated. We will treat Federalism and Pluralism as alternative strategies for the management of the problem of difference, (particularly religious difference,) and for decentralizing the modern state. First, we will explore the common origins of both in feudal relationships, church self-government and the state of the estates. Second, we reconstruct the origins of the modern state and its doctrine of sovereignty, as answers to perceived threats in pluralist fragmentation, and imperial and papal trans-polity organization. Third, we will compare the new alternatives of centralized territorial state and decentralized federations.  Using Tocqueville we will present the American design combining federalism and pluralism. Fourth we will present some revivals, successful or attempted of federalism and pluralism in the contemporary world. Fifth, we will consider four case studies: Turkey (imperial pluralism and republican centralization); Israel (pluralism without federalism), India (centralized federalism and partial pluralism) and Canada (federalism and multi-culturalism). As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 8101.

POLS G8606 Liberalism. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

Examines the way in which writers in the liberal tradition of political thought have grappled with major institutional questions from the 17th through 19th centuries. Works by Hobbes, Locke, Smith and Mill. Writings considered as reflections on and responses to three major historical events: the development of the modern state, the emergence of market systems, and the growth of national identities.

POLS G8613 Interpretations of Democracy. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 8113.  

POLS G8621 The Federal Convention. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

The seminar will cover the background and the dynamics of the Federal Convention that proposed the Constitution of the United States in 1787. The basic readings are Vols. I and II of Max Farrand's Records of the Federal Convention, mainly based on the notes that James Madison took during the Convention. (Passages from this work will be assigned later.) The purpose of the seminar is partly to illuminate the nature of constitutions and of constitution-making more generally, and partly to identify causal mechanisms that can explain the choices that were made at the Convention. Theories of collective action, of bargaining and of deliberation will have a central place. We shall not study the process of ratification of the Constitution, except to the extent that the framers' anticipation of the ratifying conventions constrained their choices. Nor shall we draw heavily on The Federalist Papers, except when they illuminate the sometimes cryptic statements in Madison's notes. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 8121.

POLS G8624 Race in the History of Western Ideas. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Race in the History of Western Ideas is an advanced Political Theory course about the complex relationship between the scientific concept of race, political subjugation and the history of modern political ideas. Race in the History of Western Ideas is NOT a course about the political behavior of ‘racial' or ‘ethnic' groups. Nor does the course focus on ONE political theoretical approach or hypothesis (e.g.: Marxist, "anti-racist," liberal or multi-cultural) in answer to the questions "How/Why did ‘race' emerge as a legitimate account of human difference?" First we ask, how did the ancients think of human diversity? To answer, we examine how Aristotle differentiates citizens from slaves and foreigners, thereby proposes a hierarchical constitution that is central to the reciprocal rule proposed in Politics. We then examine the emergence of race as a "legitimate" theory of human difference in Enlightenment anthropology and liberal political thought. We identify the features of race thinking that serve to differentiate modern conceptualizations of human diversity and visions of ‘the political' from those of the ancient world. Finally, we examine how activist and anti-racist intellectuals sought to de-naturalize and thus re-politicize race by either demonstrating the fallacy of race science or linking the significance, ubiquity and power of race to political subjugation. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 8124.

POLS G8625 Imperialism and Political Theory. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: permission of the instructor prior to registration.

This is a reading course for graduate students, surveying the literature from an interesting new area of study in political theory. By reading and discussing a number of recent works and a couple of classics, we will attempt to identify the common characteristics of the various entities that have been described as “empires” from ancient Greece to the present day, and to evaluate the ideas that have been offered as justifications for and critiques of imperial projects. Issues for consideration will include: What is an empire? How has imperialism informed the arguments of canonical works of political philosophy? Do commerce and capitalism stimulate or suppress imperialism? Can imperialism persist after de-colonization? What strategies are appropriate for combatting imperialism? Are international institutions imperialist? Has the United States ever been an empire? Is it one now? And is any sort of imperialism acceptable?

POLS G8640 Commerce and Civic Virtue. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

This graduate seminar in political theory will examine 18th century philosophies of commerce, civic virtue, and freedom, with a focus on arguments about the salutary political and moral consequences of economic interdependence both domestic and international. The course is centered on primary texts, including the works of Bernard Mandeville, Adam Smith, David Hume, Montesquieu, and Immanuel Kant. The selected reading will highlight the gradual dismantlement of the classical republican aversion to wealth accumulation, and the rehabilitation of avarice into an integrative (even edifying) social force. Students will be required to write a number of short discussion papers during the course of the semester, as well as a final research paper where they will focus on a particular problem addressed by one of the major thinkers covered in the class. In the research paper, students will also be required to develop familiarity with key positions in the secondary literature, with guidance from the course instructor. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 8140.

POLS G8651 Normative Theories of Justice. 3 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Theories of retributive and distributive justice, with emphasis on work published during the last thirty years.  Competing formulations of the principle that people should not suffer as a result of brute bad luck and that relative advantages and disadvantages should as far as possible arise from voluntary choices. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 8151.

POLS G8672 Republicanism. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

We will study the main texts of republican thought classical, modern and contemporary focusing on two main themes that are essentially related to contemporary political theory: republicanism's relationship with liberalism and with democracy. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 8172.

POLS G8804 Colloquium On International Political Economy. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

This is a survey course in international political economy. It will be conducted in a condensed format, meeting twice a week for half a semester. The first objective of the course will be to provide students a brief introduction to the large academic literature on key topics in IPE (incl. the politics of immigration, trade, foreign investment, and development). The course will thus help students prepare for the synthesis and analysis that is required in the comprehensive exam. Furthermore, the course will aim to introduce students to a variety of frontier research problems that currently animate work in the field, so they can see and evaluate examples of how empirical research is actually conducted rather than just commenting on “the classics”. Finally, the course will help students initiate one of their own research projects, thus gaining some practical experience in elaborating a theoretical argument, drawing out testable implications, and analyzing relevant evidence. This course begins September 8, 2015 and ends on October 22, 2015.

POLS G8807 Armed Groups and Political Violence. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor prior to registration.

This seminar will explore contemporary conflicts from a variety of different disciplinary approaches. We will cover a wide selection of topics related to the causes and dynamics of political violence as well as the organization and behavior of rebel organizations. The readings are drawn from works produced by academics as well as rebel theorists, policy makers and journalists. The course will be graded on a 25-25-50 basis, with a reading response worth 25%, a substantive research paper worth 50%, and class attendance and participation worth 25%. You are expected to attend all lectures and films and participat in the discussion.

POLS G8811 Civil Wars. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

This course is a graduate-level survey of recent literature on civil wars. It will focus particularly on: developing an operational definition of civil war; understanding causes of civil war, with a focus on secessionism; examining strategies of violence employed in civil war; and, civil war termination.

POLS G8821 Topics in International Relations and Rational Choice. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

The first part of the course will be on the rationalist explanations of bargaining breakdown and bilateral conflict, including the analysis of leaders' selection, strategic militarization, and other variables at the boundary between domestic and international choices. The second part of the course will focus on alliance formation and multilateral conflict. Then we will bring the insights from bilateral and multilateral conflict together and will study the open problems in conflict resolution mechanism design. The final part will be on cooperation, as opposed to conflict. We will present models and useful frameworks to study the functioning of international organizations and their development in an anarchic system.

POLS G8823 Debates in International Peace Interventions: Constructivists, critical theorists, pols-structuralists, feminists, and their critics. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Interested students should join the electronic wait list.

This seminar uses the literature on recent peace interventions as a lens for understanding the strengths and weaknesses of constructivist, critical, post-structuralist, and feminist approaches to international relations. The course will develop students' knowledge of the most salient international peace interventions in recent years, and the reasons for their successes or failures. It will also provide students with the intellectual tools to understand, evaluate, analyze, and possibly employ non-positivist and non-rational choice approaches to international relations.

POLS G8839 The Causes and Consequences of Terrorism. 3 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS G6801 or the instructor's permission.

This course examines the politics of terrorism, with a focus on theoretical and empirical studies of its causes and consequences. We will look at both domestic and transnational forms of terrorism. We begin with issues of definition, and theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of terrorism. We then turn to the causes of terrorism, considering questions such as when, where, and why terrorism occurs, which individuals and which groups resort to terror and why, and who are the targets of terrorist attacks. We then turn to the consequences of terrorism, both for the outcome of conflicts, and for domestic politics.

POLS G8843 International Law and International Relations. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

The central question around which this course is organized is: Under what circumstances, and how, do international legal rules influence political outcomes? International law has been for decades dismissed by IR scholars as utopian, disconnected from political reality, or (at best) epiphenomenal to the interests and preferences of powerful states. Consequently, it has been viewed as the 'wrong' place to look when seeking to explain the past actions of states and governments, or to predict their future behavior. Nevertheless, states—including great powers—have invested, and continue to invest, enormous resources, in elaborating and maintaining international treaties and conventions, customary rules, and other types of international legal doctrine. This suggests that international law 'matters' somehow to relations between states—although perhaps not in ways we conventionally associate with domestic legal systems.

POLS G8844 Nationalism. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

Theory and history of nationalism and international conflict. Nationalism as a cause of conflict in contemporary world politics. Role of the international community in promoting or containing nationalism.

POLS G8856 Political Economy of Environmental and Energy Policy. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission prior to registration.

This class brings graduate students to the research frontier in the political economy of environmental and energy policy. The goal of the class is to prepare students to conduct theoretically innovative, empirically rigorous, and substantively relevant research in the elds of political science, public policy, and economics. The class covers a wide range of topics, but the primary emphasis of the class is in understanding policy formulation. Political economy oers a set of tools for understanding how public opinion, interest groups, political institutions, and other factors shape governmental policy. Because virtually every environmental and energy problem requires a policy solution, understanding the policy formulation process is key to the future of energy and the environment. To understand the important of policy formulation, consider the following questions: 1. Why are some countries making ambitious investments in renewable energy, while others are not? 2. What determines the ability of Brazilian states and municipalities to control deforestation? 3. When and how do governments subsidize the consumption of fossil fuels? These are but some examples of policy questions that are critical to the sustainable development of human civilization and the planet. As we shall see in this class, answers to these questions revolve around politics.

POLS G8861 Change In the International System.. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

The causes of change in the relative position of actors in the international system as well as the causes of fundamental changes in the character of those units. The main focus will be on the last issue. The dynamics behind institutional diversity and isomorphism. Why do historical epochs favor one type of organization over another? Structural realist views and alternative research programs used.

POLS G8865 United States Foreign Policy. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Please contact instructor for more information.

Survey of post-Cold War U.S. policy, relations with Europe, East Asia, and the Middle East, military and economic policy, political intervention (human rights policy and covert action), and environmental diplomacy.

POLS G8866 International Signaling and Communication. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission prior to registration.

This course will delve into how states infer what others are likely to do in the future and how they try to project desired images of how they will behave.  This involves both purposeful or intended communication, as in diplomacy, and the ways in which perceivers try to discern others' capabilities and intentions from attributes and behaviors that the senders cannot readily manipulate.  Substantive areas to be covered--or at least touched on--include how states try to open negotiations without appearing weak, how promises and threats can be orchestrated, and the use of peace feelers.

POLS G9440 Study of Development Strategies. 2 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

The focus of the course is close reading and re-analysis of emerging research in the political economy of development, broadly construed. The focus is on well-identified research whether based on experimental or observational data. It is intended for advanced graduate students (third-fourth year) who already have strong analytic skills. Auditors are welcome as long as they put in the work. Second time takers/auditors are also welcome. The overall structure is that in most weeks an external speaker comes to discuss new or in-progress research. The speaker does not present the work, however; instead they share their papers, data and code with the class in advance and a "replication team" has a week to put together a detailed discussion of the work. In other weeks we do something similar with work in progress of students in the class. Note this course has an unusal format, meeting roughly once every two weeks over the course of the year. The course meets late in the afternoon and is generally followed by a dinner for a group of participants. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 8440.

POLS G9902 Dissertation Seminar. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to advanced students in the political science Ph.D. program except by the instructor's permission.

Provides students the opportunity to present draft dissertation proposals and draft dissertation chapters.

POLS GR4132 Political Thought - Classical and Medieval. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Contemporary Civilization or a comparable introduction to political theory course.

In this course, we will read classical and medieval writings that span multiple linguistic, historic and religious contexts. The goal is to explore similar notions of the just world that span these varied writings, from Plato's Republic to Zoroastrian and Early Islamic writings on just rule. Such similarities will highlight how some of these works represent cultural amalgams that blend Greek, Persian and Arabic elements. Yet, we will also consider how these writings differ and how their authors constructed them to respond to their unique political concerns. Throughout this course, we will consider how authors drew upon their foreign status, as aliens, outsiders, or clients to conquering tribes, to transform politics. And we will ask why these authors invoke and re-imagine particular models of the just world to represent their ideal notions of sovereignty, equity and justice. In the end, we will question how the foreign roots of ancient and medieval thought can help us fathom the basic underpinnings of founding documents today.

Fall 2016: POLS GR4132
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4132 001/13346 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
507 Philosophy Hall
Giovanni Giorgini 4 8/30

POLS GR4454 Comparative Politics of South Asia. 4 points.

This course first compares the post-independence political histories of South Asian countries, particularly India and Pakistan.  It then explores selected topics across countries: social and cultural dimensions of politics; structures of power; and political behavior.  The underlying theme is to explain the development and durability of the particular political regimes – democratic or authoritarian – in each country.

Fall 2016: POLS GR4454
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4454 001/10948 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
603 Hamilton Hall
Philip Oldenburg 4 1/30

POLS GR4472 Japanese Politics. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Surveys key features of the Japanese political system, with focus on political institutions and processes. Themes include party politics, bureaucratic power, the role of the Diet, voting behavior, the role of the state in the economy, and the domestic politics of foreign policy.

Fall 2016: POLS GR4472
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4472 001/68148 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
418 International Affairs Bldg
Takako Hikotani 4 1/18

POLS GR4476 Korean Politics. 0 points.

Fall 2016: POLS GR4476
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4476 001/86296 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
303 Hamilton Hall
Stephen Noerper 0 12/30

POLS GR6101 Issues In Political Theory. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

A survey of selected issues and debates in political theory. Areas of the field discussed include normative political philosophy, history of political thought, and the design of political and social institutions.

Fall 2016: POLS GR6101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 6101 001/72904 T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
402 Hamilton Hall
Nadia Urbinati 4 8

POLS GR6210 Issues and Debates In American Politics I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration. Please contact the instructors for more information.

This graduate student field survey provides an overview of the scholarly study of American politics. The course has been designed for students who intend to specialize in American politics, as well as for those students whose primary interests are comparative politics, international relations, or political theory, but who desire an intensive introduction to the “American” style of political science.

Fall 2016: POLS GR6210
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 6210 001/71049 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Justin Phillips 4 1/0

POLS GR6411 Comparative Politics Survey I. 4 points.

This graduate level seminar is designed to introduce students to many of the main questions motivating research in comparative politics. The course is not designed as exercise in intellectual history, although some "classics" are included. It is also not designed to teach particular approaches or methods in the study of comparative politics, although many such approaches and methods are included in the readings. Instead, it is designed to give students a sense of what we "know" today about the answers to some major questions that animate the subfield and to encourage students to develop the analytical skills, substantive knowledge, and theoretical insights necessary to make their own contributions to comparative politics and political science. Comparative Politics Survey II builds on the topics developed in Comparative Politics Survey I, but can easily be taken before taking Comparative Politics Survey I. Topics to be covered in the surveys include among others, institutions, culture, parties, violence, collective action, economic development, bureaucracy, regimes and regime change, the welfare state, corruption and political behavior.

Fall 2016: POLS GR6411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 6411 001/67571 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Maria Victoria Murillo 4 5

POLS GR6801 Theories of International Relations. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

Issues and problems in theory of international politics; systems theories and the current international system; the domestic sources of foreign policy and theories of decision making; transnational forces, the balance of power, and alliances.

Fall 2016: POLS GR6801
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 6801 001/75529 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
1302 International Affairs Bldg
Jack Snyder 4 5

POLS GR8221 Political Psychology. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

The survey course on political psychology is organized around three main themes. The first is social influence and intrinsic predispositions: obedience, conformity, social pressure, authoritarianism, and personality traits. The second theme concerns the manner in which people interpret new information about politics and use it to update their beliefs and evaluations. This section invites discussion of topics such as: To what extent and in what ways do media and politicians manipulate citizens? Can and do voters use "information shortcuts" to compensate for their lack of direct information about policies? The third theme is the meaning, measurement, and expression of ideology and prejudice.

Fall 2016: POLS GR8221
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 8221 001/63925 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Donald Green 4 27

POLS GR8237 Themes in American Political Development. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission prior to registration.

The colloquium audits work achieved under the rubric of 'American Political Development' and looks ahead to possibilities for future research. APD's concepts, premises, substantive themes, and silences will be considered, including the subfield's engagement with history and temporality, its attempts to place the United States in comparative and international perspective, and its approaches to ideas, institutions, regimes, interests, and preferences.

Fall 2016: POLS GR8237
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 8237 001/18583 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
402 International Affairs Bldg
Ira Katznelson 4 6

POLS GR8471 Chinese Politics In Comparative Perspective. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

A graduate seminar designed to explore the content, process, and problems of China's political and economic reforms in comparative perspective. Please see the Courseworks site for details

Fall 2016: POLS GR8471
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 8471 001/07698 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Xiaobo Lu 4 6

POLS GR8806 Causal Inference in International Political Economy. 4 points.

This seminar is both a critical survey of empirical evidence on foreign aid, trade, and investment and an introduction to modern quantitative research methods used in international political economy. Substantively, the seminar will examine the relationships between economic instruments and human rights, conflict, public opinion, and other topics.

Fall 2016: POLS GR8806
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 8806 001/67247 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
1302 International Affairs Bldg
Allison Carnegie 4 6

POLS GR8867 International Cooperation and Institutions. 4 points.

Why do governments and leaders cooperate?  What is the role of international institutions in world politics?  This course is an introduction to the scientific study of international cooperation and institutions.   The course emphasizes recent empirical and theoretical research across issue areas.

Fall 2016: POLS GR8867
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 8867 001/74193 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
402 International Affairs Bldg
Johannes Urpelainen 4 2

POLS GR9010 Special Research Course. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the faculty sponsor's and the department chair's permission.

Research projects formulated by individual students.

POLS GR9901 Dissertation Seminar. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to advanced students in the political science Ph.D. program except by the instructor's permission.

Provides students the opportunity to present draft dissertation proposals and draft dissertation chapters.

Fall 2016: POLS GR9901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 9901 001/15723 F 11:10am - 1:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Jeffrey Lax 4 5

POLS GU4110 Recent Continental Political Thought. 4 points.

This course will compare and contrast the theories of the political, the state,freedom, democracy, sovereignty and law, in the works of the following key 20th and 21st century continental theorists: Arendt, Castoriadis, Foucault, Habermas, Kelsen, Lefort, Schmitt, and Weber. It will be taught in seminar format.

Fall 2016: POLS GU4110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4110 001/61416 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
501 International Affairs Bldg
Jean Cohen 4 12/18

POLS GU4240 Great Books on Race, Politics and Society. 4 points.

This seminar introduces students to classic works on race, social science, and public policy. The course will explore how social scientists have defined and constructed the conditions of black communities and how those definitions and constructions have varied and influenced policy debates over time.  Students are required to write an original research paper on a policy area that examines the tensions between individual and structural explanations for the persistence of racial inequality.

Fall 2016: POLS GU4240
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4240 001/12800 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
711 International Affairs Bldg
Fredrick Harris 4 18/18

POLS GU4407 Nine Thought Trends in China. 4 points.

This course will be taught in Chinese.

Prerequisites: fluency in Chinese (the course will be taught in Chinese, and a large number of readings will be in Chinese).

This is an elective course designed for both undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in the contemporary politics in China. The course focuses on nine major thought trends in China today that include 1) the Liberalism; 2) the New Authoritarianism; 3) the New Left; 4) Mao Left; 5) the Democratic Group within the Communist Party; 6) Governing through Confucian Theory; 7) Constitutional Socialism; 8) the so-called " Neither-Left and Nor-Right " Governing Theory; and 9) the New Nationalism Calling Tough Foreign Policies. China is deep in the social and political transition process, and the thoughts and actions of intellects themself have formed an important part in this transition. In this sense, the course not only helps understand the thoughts of intellects, but also better help understand today's China affairs as a whole.

Fall 2016: POLS GU4407
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4407 001/73883 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
511 Hamilton Hall
Boshu Zhang 4 16/25

POLS GU4461 Latin American Politics. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL)., Discussion Section Required

This is a lecture class that seeks to introduce students to social scientific analysis while discuss the shifting dynamics of political representation in Latin America. In analyzing political representation in the region, it focuses on demands for political inclusion by different actors and how they were resisted or accepted by established elites in a process that moved from regime change to electoral rotation in power. The course covers these political dynamics and their institutional consequences since the onset of the twentieth century, starting with the Mexican Revolution, until the contemporary period where democracy is the predominant form of government and elections a crucial tool for social and political change. While analyzing the politics of Latin America, we will cover important political science concepts associated with democratic representation, social inclusion and the rule of the law, such as social movement mobilization, political regime change, presidentialism, political party systems, political identities, state capacity, and institutional weakness.

Fall 2016: POLS GU4461
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4461 001/68378 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Maria Victoria Murillo 4 70/70

POLS GU4700 Mathematical Methods for Political Science. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Provides students of political science with a basic set of tools needed to read, evaluate, and contribute in research areas that increasingly utilize sophisticated mathematical techniques.

Fall 2016: POLS GU4700
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4700 001/13397 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
304 Hamilton Hall
Johannes Urpelainen 4 23/40

POLS GU4710 Principles of Quantitative Political Research. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Introduction to the use of quantitative techniques in political science and public policy. Topics include descriptive statistics and principles of statistical inference and probability through analysis of variance and ordinary least-squares regression. Computer applications are emphasized.

Fall 2016: POLS GU4710
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4710 001/23131 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
413 Kent Hall
Mark Lindeman 4 68/70

POLS GU4714 Multivariate Political Analysis. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: basic data analysis and knowledge of basic calculus and matrix algebra OR concurrent enrollment in POLS W4760.

Examines problems encountered in multivariate analysis of cross-sectional and time-series data. Covers fundamentals of probability and statistics and examines problems encountered in multivariate analysis of cross-sectional and time-series data. More mathematical treatment of topics covered in POLS W4710 and W4712.

Fall 2016: POLS GU4714
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4714 001/78443 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
603 Hamilton Hall
Benjamin Goodrich 4 3/40

POLS GU4732 Research Topics in Game Theory. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: POLS W4730 or the instructor's permission.

Advanced topics in game theory will cover the study of repeated games, games of incomplete information and principal-agent models with applications in the fields of voting, bargaining, lobbying and violent conflict. Results from the study of social choice theory, mechanism design and auction theory will also be treated. The course will concentrate on mathematical techniques for constructing and solving games. Students will be required to develop a topic relating political science and game theory and to write a formal research paper.

Fall 2016: POLS GU4732
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4732 001/92346 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
404 International Affairs Bldg
Carlo Prato 4 16

POLS GU4792 Advanced Topics in Quantitative Research: Models for Panel and Time-Series Cross-Section Data. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

This course covers methods for models for repeated observations data. These kinds of data represent tremendous opportunities as well as formidable challenges for making inferences. The course will focus on how to estimate models for panel and time-series cross-section data. Topics covered include fixed effects, random effects, dynamic panel models, random coefficient models, and models for qualitative dependent variables.

Fall 2016: POLS GU4792
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4792 001/12762 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
327 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Gregory Wawro 4 24

POLS GU4895 War, Peace, and Strategy. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Survey of the causes of war and peace, functions of military strategy, interaction of political ends and military means. Emphasis on 20th-century conflicts; nuclear deterrence; economic, technological, and moral aspects of strategy; crisis management; and institutional norms and mechanisms for promoting stability.

Fall 2016: POLS GU4895
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4895 001/15300 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
417 International Affairs Bldg
Richard Betts 4 75

POLS W4128 The Philosophy of Social Science. 0 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

POLS W4134 Modern Political Thought. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Interpretations of civil society and the foundations of political order according to the two main traditions of political thought--contraction and Aristotelian. Readings include works by Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Montesquieu, Hume, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Saint-Simon, Tocqueville, Marx, and Mill.

POLS W4150 Crisis and Critique: The Frankfurt School. 3 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

This course centers on the writings of the key figures associated with the "first generation" of the Frankfurt School: Max Horkheimer, Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Franz Neumann, Otto Kirschheimer, Friedrich Pollock, and Herbert Marcuse. In addition, it includes various background readings from thinkers whose works were key references for the critical theorists of the Frankfurt School: Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Sigmund Freud, Max Weber and Gyorgy Lukacs. The course takes the Holocaust as a turning point for the members of this group, as this event brought their conception of critical theory into a crisis, urged them to rethink their assumptions about the relationship between theory and practice, dampened their hopes for revolutionary social change, and compelled them to undertake a much more radical critique of the Enlightenment. We will study the changing and divergent trajectories of critical theory by convering a wide range of material, including different perspetives on reason and rationality, the relationship between theory and practice, intertwinement of freedom and domination in modernity, and pathologies of mass society.

Fall 2016: POLS W4150
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4150 001/00656 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Ayten Gundogdu 3 12/30

POLS W4210 Research Topics in Game Theory. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W4209 or the instructor's permission.

Advanced topics in game theory will cover the study of repeated games, games of incomplete information and principal-agent models with applications in the fields of voting, bargaining, lobbying and violent conflict. Results from the study of social choice theory, mechanism design and auction theory will also be treated. The course will concentrate on mathematical techniques for constructing and solving games. Students will be required to develop a topic relating political science and game theory and to write a formal research paper. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 4731.

POLS W4291 Advanced Topics in Quantitative Research. 3 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Instruction in methods for models that have dependent variables that are not continuous, including dichotomous and polychotomous response models, models for censored and truncated data, sample selection models and duration models. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 4790.

POLS W4292 Advanced Topics in Quantitative Research: Models for Panel and Time-Series Cross-Section Data. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

This course covers methods for models for repeated observations data. These kinds of data represent tremendous opportunities as well as formidable challenges for making inferences. The course will focus on how to estimate models for panel and time-series cross-section data. Topics covered include fixed effects, random effects, dynamic panel models, random coefficient models, and models for qualitative dependent variables. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 4792.

POLS W4360 Mathematical Methods for Political Science. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Provides students of political science with a basic set of tools needed to read, evaluate, and contribute in research areas that increasingly utilize sophisticated mathematical techniques. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 4700.

POLS W4365 Design and Analysis of Sample Surveys. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: basic statistics and regression analysis (for example: POLS 4911, STAT 2024 or 4315, SOCI 4075, etc.)

Survey sampling is central to modern social science. We discuss how to design, conduct, and analyze surveys, with a particular focus on public opinion surveys in the United States. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 4764.

POLS W4368 Experimental Research: Design, Analysis and Interpretation. 3 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: one or two semesters of statistics; basic understanding of probability, hypothesis testing, and regression are assumed. Basic familiarity with statistical software (Stata and R) is helpful but not required.

In this course, we will discuss the logic of experimentation, its strengths and weaknesses compared to other methodologies, and the ways in which experimentation has been -- and could be -- used to investigate social phenomena. Students will learn how to interpret, design, and execute experiments. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 4768.

POLS W4405 Insurgencies and Conflicts in Southeast Asia. 4 points.

A number of countries in Southeast Asia have recently faced violent conflicts, often linked to separatist or regionalist demands from territorially concentrated ethnic or religious minorities. This course examines a range of conflicts in Southern Thailand (Patani), Southern Philippines (Mindanao), Indonesia (notably Aceh) and Burma, through a variety of different lenses and comparative perspectives. These include security and (counter)insurgency perspectives, the comparative character of militant movements, perspectives based on minority rights and identity politics, explorations of the salience of religion, studies of language politics, questions of autonomy and decentralization, and the issue of peace negotiations and dialogue processes. These themes and issues have a broader relevance to wider debates in comparative politics, which students will be encouraged to explore in their papers.

POLS W4470 A Free Press for a Global Society. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

POLS W4473 Political Transitions in Southeast Asia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

POLS W4474 Politics and Justice in Southeast Asia. 4 points.

The course starts from the premise that questions of justice are essentially political, and their study cannot be safely left in the sole hands of lawyers and legal experts. In recent years, a number of important global trends have become evident in the study of justice. These include a growing focus on transitional justice – especially how the transition from an authoritarian regime, or from conditions of violent conflict, may best be handled. Another important trend is the so-called ‘new constitutionalism’ – efforts to strengthen checks and balances through establishing new institutions such as constitutional courts. A third trend concerns disturbing developments in the use of the criminal justice system for essentially political purposes. This course will explore how these recent trends are being played out in various parts of Southeast Asia.

POLS W4702 Methods of Inquiry and Research Design. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

POLS W4712 Analysis of Political Data. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: POLS W4710 or the equivalent.

Multivariate and time-series analysis of political data. Topics include time-series regression, structural equation models, factor analysis, and other special topics. Computer applications are emphasized.

POLS W4730 Game Theory and Political Theory. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: POLS W4760 or equivalent level of calculus.

Application of noncooperative game theory to strategic situations in politics. Solution concepts, asymmetric information, incomplete information, signaling, repeated games, and folk theorems. Models drawn from elections, legislative strategy, interest group politics, regulation, nuclear deterrence, international relations, and tariff policy.

POLS W4764 Design and Analysis of Sample Surveys. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: basic statistics and regression analysis (for example: POLS 4712, STAT 2024 or 4315, SOCI 4075, etc.)

Survey sampling is central to modern social science. We discuss how to design, conduct, and analyze surveys, with a particular focus on public opinion surveys in the United States.

POLS W4768 Experimental Research: Design, Analysis and Interpretation. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: one or two semesters of statistics; basic understanding of probability, hypothesis testing, and regression are assumed. Basic familiarity with statistical software (Stata and R) is helpful but not required.

In this course, we will discuss the logic of experimentation, its strengths and weaknesses compared to other methodologies, and the ways in which experimentation has been -- and could be -- used to investigate social phenomena. Students will learn how to interpret, design, and execute experiments.

POLS W4790 Advanced Topics in Quantitative Research. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Instruction in methods for models that have dependent variables that are not continuous, including dichotomous and polychotomous response models, models for censored and truncated data, sample selection models and duration models.

POLS W4802 Methods of Inquiry and Research Design. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 4702.  

POLS W4820 International Relations of a Post-Western World. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS 1601 or an equivalent introductory course in international politics; an introductory course in Economics or international finance is recommended for background, but not required.

Examines emerging challenges to the Western-built order of international politics, including emerging powers and the Bretton Woods economic institutions, the reslience of the US-led security system, and the contestation of Western values issues such as human rights and democracy promotion.  Focus on Eurasia, Middle East, Africa and Southeast Asia.

POLS W4853 Politics in Russia. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

This course begins by studying the late Soviet era—the 1970s through the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991--in order to understand what kind of political system and political culture Russia inherited. We spend some time analyzing why and how the Soviet Union—a superpower for 75 years—disintegrated suddenly and for the most part, peacefully. Then, the bulk of the course focuses on state-building in the Russian Federation. Russia’s effort to construct new political institutions, a functioning economy, and a healthy society represents one of the greatest political dramas of our time. Beginning with Yeltsin’s presidency in 1991 and continuing through the current eras of Putin, Medvedev, and Putin again, we consider phenomena such as economic reform, nationalism, separatism, federalism, war, legal reform, civil society, and democratization. The third part of the course addresses Russia’s foreign relations. Like its predecessor states, the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union, Russia is concerned with what kind of state it is (or should be) and where it stands in the international order. We will study how Russian elites make sense of Russia’s identity, as well as Russia’s policies toward the US, Europe, its “near abroad,” the Middle East, and China. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 4453.

POLS W4867 U.S.-Japan Relations. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

This course surveys postwar U.S.-Japan relations with a particular emphasis on the areas of economic trade and miltary security. In each of these areas we will also examine how Japan's East Asian neighbors have influenced the bilateral relationship over time. While focusing on a number of specific case studies of policymaking and political maneuvering, we will investigate how domestic and international forces interact to shape outcomes of relations between the two countries.

POLS W4871 Chinese Foreign Policy. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

The course describes the major elements of Chinese foreign policy today, in the context of their development since 1949. We seek to understand the security-based rationale of policy as well as other factors - organizational, cultural, perceptual, and so on - that influence Chinese foreign policy. We analyze decision-making processes that affect Chinese foreign policy, China's relations with various countries and regions, Chinese policy toward key functional issues in international affairs, how the rise of China is affecting global power relations, and how other actors are responding. The course pays attention to the application of international relations theories to the problems we study, and also takes an interest in policy issues facing decision-makers in China as well as those facing decision-makers in other countries who deal with China.

POLS W4875 Russia and the West. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).
Enrollment limited to 40.Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Exploration of Russia's ambiguous relationship with the Western world. Cultural, philosophical, and historical explanations will be examined alongside theories of domestic political economy and international relations, to gain an understanding of current events. Select cases from the Tsarist, Soviet, and recent periods will be compared and contrasted, to see if patterns emerge. This course counts as an introductory-level course in international relations.

POLS W4910 Principles of Quantitative Political Research. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Introduction to the use of quantitative techniques in political science and public policy. Topics include descriptive statistics and principles of statistical inference and probability through analysis of variance and ordinary least-squares regression. Computer applications are emphasized. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 4710.

POLS W4911 Analysis of Political Data. 3 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W4910 or the equivalent.

Multivariate and time-series analysis of political data. Topics include time-series regression, structural equation models, factor analysis, and other special topics. Computer applications are emphasized. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 4712.

POLS W4912 Multivariate Political Analysis. 4 points.

Not offered during 2016-17 academic year.

Prerequisites: basic data analysis and knowledge of basic calculus and matrix algebra OR concurrent enrollment in POLS W4360.

Examines problems encountered in multivariate analysis of cross-sectional and time-series data. Covers fundamentals of probability and statistics and examines problems encountered in multivariate analysis of cross-sectional and time-series data. More mathematical treatment of topics covered in POLS W4910 and W4911. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 4714.